Africa faces 470 million COVID-19 vaccine shortfall this year

NEW YORK – PRN Africa — The international COVAX initiative aimed at guaranteeing global access to the vaccines, recently announced that it was being forced to slash planned deliveries to Africa, by around 150 million doses this year.

Covid-19

The scheme is now expected to deliver 470 million doses through the end of December. These will be enough to protect just 17 percent of the continent, far below the 40 percent target.

To reach the end-year target, that 470 million figure needs to double, even if all planned shipments via COVAX and the African Union are delivered.

@WHOAFRO #COVID19 press briefing on the pandemic & the impact of #COVAX vaccine supply challenges. Speakers include: Dr @MoetiTshidi, Dr Ayoade Alakija (@yodifiji) & @AureliaFNguyen. https://t.co/rSZVqt7anl

— WHO African Region (@WHOAFRO) September 16, 2021

Export bans, vaccine hoarding

WHO Regional Director for Africa, Matshidiso Moeti, said that “export bans and vaccine hoarding have a chokehold on vaccine supplies to Africa.”

“As long as rich countries lock COVAX out of the market, Africa will miss its vaccination goals. The huge gap in vaccine equity is not closing anywhere near fast enough. It is time for vaccine manufacturing countries to open the gates and help protect those facing the greatest risk,” Ms. Moeti said.

Besides export bans, challenges in boosting production and delays in approvals have constrained deliveries. COVAX has called for donor countries to share their supply schedules to give more clarity on deliveries.

The initiative has also called for countries with enough doses, to give up their place in the queue. Manufacturers must deliver in line with their prior commitments, and countries that are well-advanced must expand and accelerate donations.

About 95 million more doses are set to arrive in Africa via COVAX throughout September, which will be the largest shipment the continent has taken on board for any month so far. Just 50 million people, or 3.6 per cent of its population, has been inoculated to date.

Only around 2 percent of the nearly 6 billion doses administered globally have gone to Africans. The European Union and the United Kingdom have vaccinated over 60 percent of their populations and high-income countries have administered 48 times more doses per person, than low-income nations.

Variants risk

“The staggering inequity and severe lag in shipments of vaccines threaten to turn areas in Africa with low vaccination rates into breeding grounds for vaccine-resistant variants. This could end up sending the whole world back to square one,” warned Ms. Moeti.

WHO is ramping up support to African countries to identify and address gaps in their COVID-19 vaccine rollouts.

The agency has assisted 15 countries in conducting intra-action reviews and offered recommendations for improvements. The reviews have shown that vaccine supply security and uncertainty around deliveries has been a major impediment.

With over 300 staff in place across Africa supporting the COVID-19 response, WHO is deploying experts and producing support plans in specific areas, including securing staff, financing, strengthening supply chains and logistics and boosting demand for vaccines.

Case summary

As of 14 September, there were 8.06 million COVID-19 cases recorded in Africa and while the third wave wanes, there were nearly 125,000 new cases in the week ending on 12 September.

This represents a 27 percent drop from the previous week, but weekly new cases are still at about the peak of the first wave, and 19 countries continue to report high or fast-rising case numbers.

Deaths fell by 19 percent across Africa, to 2,531 reported in the week to September 12th. The highly transmissible Delta variant has been found in 31 African countries.

SOURCE UN News Centre

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.