General Assembly Approves Nearly $8 Billion for 15 Peacekeeping Missions in 2016/2017

UN General Assembly

UN General Assembly

NEW YORK – PRN Africa  — Approving the appropriation of $7.86 billion for 15 peacekeeping operations for the 2016/2017 fiscal period, the General Assembly today adopted 25 resolutions and one decision contained in reports from its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary). (See Press Release GA/AB/4201.)  One of the texts addressed cross-cutting issues related to the financing of United Nations peacekeeping operations, through which the Assembly expressed serious concern over sexual exploitation and abuse allegations involving peacekeeping missions. In that regard, it welcomed the appointment of a Special Coordinator on improving the United Nations response to sexual exploitation, and ask the Secretary-General to regularly update States on her work.

Appropriating funds for peacekeeping operations from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, the Assembly adopted resolutions on missions in Abyei, the Central African Republic, Côte d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Darfur, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Golan, Haiti, Kosovo, Liberia, Mali, Somalia, South Sudan, Western Sahara and Somalia. All texts were adopted without a vote, with the exception of a resolution setting out budgetary arrangements for the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), which it adopted by a recorded vote of 155 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States), with no abstentions.

The Assembly also adopted three related drafts on the support account for peacekeeping operations, and financing for the account, as well as for the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy, and Regional Service Centre in Entebbe, Uganda. Also adopted was a text on the United Nations financial reports and audited financial statements on peacekeeping missions, as well as the Board of Auditors’ reports on them.

In addition, the Assembly adopted texts on three closed peacekeeping missions: the United Nations Mission in the Central African Republic and Chad (MINURCAT), United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste (UNMIT) and the United Nations Support Mission in Syria (UNSMIS). In addition, it adopted a draft resolution on special subjects relating to the 2015-2016 programme budget of the Organization and a draft decision, by which it deferred until the second part of its resumed seventy-first session, consideration of reports on the financial position of closed peacekeeping missions.

In other business, the Assembly elected, by acclamation, Burundi, from the African Group, and Sri Lanka, from the Asia-Pacific Group, to the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law, for six-year terms of office beginning on 27 June.

The representative of Syria also made a statement

Elections for United Nations Commission on International Trade Law. The General Assembly first elected, by acclamation, Burundi, from the African Group, and Sri Lanka, from the Asia-Pacific Group, to the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law for six-year terms of office beginning on 27 June.

Action on Draft Resolutions
The Assembly then took action on the draft resolutions contained in reports from its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary), which were introduced by Committee Rapporteur Gert Auväärt (Estonia).

First, it adopted a resolution contained in the budget Committee’s report on “financial reports and audited financial statements, and reports of the Board of Auditors” (document A/70/624/Add.2), accepting the financial report and audited financial statements of United Nations peacekeeping operations for the period 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015. It endorsed the recommendations in the corresponding reports of the Board and the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ), and asked the Secretary-General to ensure their full implementation. It went on to ask the Secretary-General to indicate an expected time frame for implementation, and to give, in his next report, a full explanation for delays in implementation of the Board’s outstanding recommendations, the root causes of recurring issues and measures to be taken.

Turning to reports on peacekeeping missions, the Assembly first adopted a text on “financing of the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA)” (document A/70/926), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNISFA the amount of $284.83 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $268.62 million for the maintenance of the Force, $11.67 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $2.83 million for the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy, and $1.71 million for the Regional Service Centre at Entebbe, Uganda.

It then adopted a resolution on “financing of the United Nations Mission in the Central African Republic and Chad (MINURCAT)” (document A/70/927), by which it took note of the status of contributions to the Mission as of 30 April, including the $35.05 million in credits, decided that Member States which had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission would be credited with their respective share of the $35.05 million in net cash available as of 30 April 2016, and that those which had not fulfilled their financial obligations would have their respective share set off against their outstanding obligations, in line with the levels updated in resolution 64/249 of 24 December 2009.

Turning to a report on “financing of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA)” (document A/70/928), the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Mission $976.27 million from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $920.73 million for the Mission’s maintenance, $39.99 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $9.71 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $5.85 million for the Regional Service Centre.

The Assembly then adopted a text on “financing of the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI)” (document A/70/929). By its terms, it would appropriate $8.26 million to the Special Account for UNOCI for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $6.65 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $1.61 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

It then adopted a resolution on “financing of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP)” (document A/70/930). By its terms, it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNFICYP $57.81 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $54.85 million for the maintenance of the Force, $2.38 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $578,400 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

Next, it adopted a report on “financing of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO)” (document A/70/931), appropriating to the Special Account for MONUSCO $1.31 billion for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $1.24 billion for the maintenance of the Mission, $53.67 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $13.03 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $7.85 million for the Regional Service Centre.

The Assembly went on to adopt a resolution on “financing of the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste (UNMIT)” (document A/70/932). By the text, it took note of the status of contributions to UNMIT as of 30 April 2016, including the $900,000 in outstanding contributions, noted with concern that only 171 Member States had paid their assessed contributions in full, and urged all other Member States, in particular those in arrears, to ensure payment of their outstanding contributions. It also decided that Member States which had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission shall be credited with their respective share of the $9.06 million in net cash available as of 30 April 2016 and that those Member States which had not fulfilled their financial obligations would have their respective share set off against their outstanding obligations, in accordance with the levels updated in resolution 67/239 of 24 December 2012.

The Assembly then adopted a resolution contained in the Committee’s report on “financing of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH)” (document A/70/933) by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for that Mission $364.60 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $345.93 million for MINUSTAH’s maintenance, $15.02 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $3.65 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.
Next, the Assembly adopted a resolution on “financing of the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK)” (document A/70/934), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNMIK $38.46 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $36.49 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $1.58 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $384,800 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

It then adopted a resolution on “financing of the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL)” (document A/70/935). By its terms, it appropriated to the Special Account for UNMIL $197.24 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $187.14 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $8.13 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $1.97 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

The Assembly also adopted a resolution on “financing of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA)” (document A/70/594/Add.1), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Force $989.72 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $933.41 million for the maintenance of the Mission, $40.54 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $9.84 million for the United Nations Logistics Base, Italy, and $5.93 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Under its agenda item on financing of the United Nations peacekeeping forces in the Middle East, the Assembly took action on resolutions contained in two reports.
It first adopted a draft on the “United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF)” (document A/70/936), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Force $50.29 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $47.71 million for its maintenance, $2.07 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $503,200 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

The representative of Syria said his delegation felt that it was Israel’s responsibility to pay for UNDOF because that country’s occupation had led to the establishment of the Force. It then turned to a resolution contained in the report on the “United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL)” (document A/70/937).
By a recorded vote of 104 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States), with 49 abstentions, the Assembly adopted preambular paragraph 4 and operative paragraphs 4, 5 and 13.

Taking action on the draft resolution as a whole, the Assembly adopted it as amended by a recorded vote of 155 in favour to 3 against (Canada, Israel, United States), with no abstentions. By its terms, the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for UNIFIL $515.07 million, for the period from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $488.69 million for the maintenance of the Force, $21.22 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $5.15 million for the United Nations Logistics Base.

Also by the text, the Assembly expressed deep concern that Israel had not complied with previous resolutions on UNIFIL, and requested that the Secretary-General take the measures necessary to ensure the full implementation of their relevant paragraphs. The Committee then adopted a resolution on “financing of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS)” (document A/70/938), by which the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Mission $1.15 billion for the period from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $1.08 billion for its maintenance, $46.98 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $11.41 million for the United Nations Logistics Base, and $6.87 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Next, the Assembly adopted a resolution on “financing of the United Nations Supervision Mission in the Syrian Arab Republic (UNSMIS)” (document A/70/939), by which it took note of the status of contributions to UNSMIS as of 30 April 2016, including outstanding contributions in the amount of $100,0000, noted with concern that only 153 Member States have paid their assessed contributions in full, and urged all other Member States, in particular those in arrears, to ensure payment of their outstanding assessed contributions.

The Assembly also decided that Member States that had fulfilled their financial obligations to the Mission shall be credited with their respective share of the $1.82 million in net cash available as of 30 April 2016 and that those that had not fulfilled their financial obligations would have their respective share set off against their outstanding obligations, in accordance with the levels updated in resolution 64/249 of 24 December 2009.

The Assembly then adopted the resolution in the report on “financing of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO)” (document A/70/940), by which it decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the Mission $55.39 million for the period from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $52.55 million for Mission’s maintenance, $2.28 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $554,200 for the United Nations Logistics Base.

It then adopted a resolution on “financing of the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID)” (document A/70/941), by which it appropriated to the Special Account for the Operation $1.10 billion from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $1.04 billion for the maintenance of the Operation, $45.15 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations and $10.97 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $6.60 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Taking up the report on “financing of the activities arising from Security Council resolution 1863 (2009)” (document A/70/942), the Assembly decided to appropriate to the Special Account for the United Nations Support Office for the African Union Mission in Somalia (UNSOA) $608.95 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $574.30 million for the maintenance of the Office, $24.94 million for the support account for peacekeeping operations, $6.06 million for the United Nations Logistics Base and $3.65 million for the Regional Service Centre.

Turning to the report on “administrative and budgetary aspects of financing peacekeeping operations (document A/70/943)”, the Assembly adopted four resolutions contained therein. It first adopted resolution I on cross-cutting issues. By that text, the General Assembly addressed several key areas, including budget presentation and financial management, personnel issue, operational requirements, protection from sexual exploitation and abuse, and other issues.

The Assembly took note of the Secretary-General’s reports on the overview of the financing of United Nations peacekeeping operations: budget performance for the period from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015 and budget for the period from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, and special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and abuse.
On budget presentation, it welcomed the new format of the Secretary-General’s overview report and encouraged further such development, stressed the importance of further steps to make more accurate forecasts and asked the Secretary-General to report in his next overview report on improvements made due to implementation of Umoja and the International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS). In the area of personnel issues, the Assembly asked the Secretary-General to improve the ratio of substantive to support staff, and urged him to make every effort to reduce recruitment lead time for staff in field missions, to enhance the transparency of the staffing process at all stages and to report on the steps taken and results achieved in the context of his next overview report.

The Assembly also requested that the Secretary-General report on measures taken to expand women’s participation in peacekeeping operations and make further recommendations to increase the numbers of uniformed and civilian women. It recalled paragraph 107 of the report of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) and paragraph 14, section II, of its resolution 63/250 and requested the Secretary-General, in the context of the next report on Human Resources Management, to provide detailed analysis on the financial implications and justification for the proposed expansion of the maximum duration of temporary duty assignments to meet requirements directly linked to a mission start-up or expansion due to a crisis. It also requested the Secretary-General provide the same detailed analysis, with financial implications and justification, on extending the engagement duration of retired staff.

On reducing the overall environmental footprint of peacekeeping missions, the Assembly asked the Secretary-General to continue his efforts in full compliance with relevant rules and regulations. Recalling paragraph 40 of resolution 69/307, it requested the Secretary-General to report on efforts to ensure that procurement of unmanned aerial systems from commercial providers complied with the United Nations Procurement Manual. It also recalled its request to the Secretary-General to ensure that reimbursement of such systems provided by troop-contributing countries was consistent with the framework set out in the Contingent-Owned Equipment Manual.

In the areas of procurement and asset management across peacekeeping missions, the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to strengthen oversight and internal controls, taking into account mission needs and the full implementation of the IPSAS. It also asked the Advisory Committee to request the Board of Auditors to compile and issue lessons learned from the Global Field Support Strategy on its website.

Welcoming the appointment of the Special Coordinator on improving the United Nations response to sexual exploitation and abuse, the Assembly, expressing serious concern over the matter in the most recent report, asked the Secretary-General to regularly update States on her progress. Recognizing the risk factors linked to those allegations as identified by the Secretary-General in paragraph 25 of his report, the Assembly asked him to further analyse all such factors, provide recommendations to mitigate the risks and include in his future reports information on such abuse allegations by non-United Nations forces operating under a Security Council mandate. Noting with concern the findings of the independent review, it also asked the Secretary-General to report on lessons learned and measures to improve the system-wide response to such abuse.

In addition, the Assembly asked the Secretary-General to continue promoting effective coordination and collaboration within the Office of Insight Oversight Services’ audit, evaluation and investigation functions in order to ensure an integrated approach for oversight of peacekeeping missions.  Next, it adopted resolution II on the support account for peacekeeping operations. By its terms, the Assembly decided to approve the support account requirements of $327.38 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017, including $18.83 million for the enterprise resource planning project and $821,500 for information and systems security. It also approved the requirement of 1,341 continuing and 25 new temporary posts, as well as the redeployment, reassignment and reclassification of posts, as set out in annex I of the text, 97 continuing and seven new general temporary assistance positions and 41 person-months, as set out in annex II, as well as related post and non-post requirements.

Adopting resolution III on financing of the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi, Italy, the Assembly approved the cost estimates for the Base in the amount of $82.86 million for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017.

Finally, it adopted resolution IV on financing of the Regional Service Centre in Entebbe, Uganda, by which it approved the amount of $39.2 million for the maintenance of the Centre for the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017.

Taking up the report on the “programme budget for the biennium 2016-2017” (document A/70/648/Add.2), the Assembly adopted a resolution contained therein on special subjects relating to the programme budget for the biennium 2016-2017. By its terms, the Assembly endorsed the conclusions and recommendations contained in the report of the ACABQ on supporting the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda of the third International Conference on Financing for Development.

Also by that text, having considered the report of the Secretary-General on revised estimates relating to his report on the future of United Nations peace operations, specifically the implementation of the recommendations of the High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations, the Assembly approved additional resources of $2.06 million net of staff assessment under section 3, Political Affairs ($1.60 million) and section 29D, Office of Central Support Services ($469,200).

Finally, acting on the Committee’s report on review of the efficiency of the administration and financial functioning of the United Nations (document A/70/649/Add.2), the Assembly deferred until the second part of its resumed seventy-first session consideration of the reports of the Secretary-General and the ACABQ on closed peacekeeping missions.

SOURCE General Assembly of the United Nations

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