Malawian executed in Indonesia over drug trafficking

Prison in IndonesiaThe Indonesia government has resumed execution several years after nobody has been condemned to such death, a penalty, and the first to taste such a penalty is a Malawian drug trafficker.

The 48 year old Malawian, Adami Wilson sentenced to death in 2005 for smuggling a kilogram of heroin has been executed by a firing squad in the north of the capital Jakarta Friday March 15 2013.

However the news has not gone well with the Amnesty International (AI) who opposes death penalty, describing it as shocking, regressive and outrageous, especially that authorities in Indonesia have disclosed that nine more might face the same fate this year.

“This is really outrageous news. We oppose the death penalty in all circumstances, but Indonesia’s indication to put even more people to death is even more shocking,” AI Indonesia Researcher Papang Hidayat has said.

He added: “What makes this so disappointing is that we have really seen the Indonesian government sending progressive signals on moving away from the death penalty in recent years.”

According to information sourced by NewsTimeAfrica the last time execution was done in Indonesia was in November 2008 when five people were put to death, three of whom were men involved in the 2002 Bali bombings that killed 202 people.

In Indonesia the condemned prisoner is notified of his execution at least 72 hours beforehand with the executions usually carried out by firing squad in the middle of the night in isolated locations,  and it is believed that currently there are no less than 100 people are on death row in the country.

At the 2012 UN General Assembly Indonesia is reported to have abstained from voting against a resolution calling for a global moratorium on the death penalty.

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